Does apoptosis recapitulate phylogeny in reverse?

You can blow a house to smithereens using explosives or you can carefully deconstruct it to avoid collateral damage. Necrosis is the former, apoptosis the latter.  The intricate apoptotic  pathways used to safely deconstruct cells are widely documented. The question that remains is why such a highly sophisticated, energy expending process ever came into being. The scanning electron micrographs shown below are of images well known to those familiar with the process of apoptosis.  However, the UV photomicrographs just below them were derived from the same type of cells engaged in the apoptotic deconstruction shown in the first set of images.  In the literature, you will find images that show a roughly similar rosetting  effect within the confines of a defined membranous structure; but nothing comes close to the display of beaded circular and irregular “strings of pearls” seen in the photomicrographs shown in this blog. In addition, these beaded circles come in a range of sizes that may include several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the beads seem to be interconnected by something beyond the resolution of light microscopy. So what exactly is going on here? I believe these images are showing a hierarchical deconstruction of the DNA superstructure based upon how it was originally constructed throughout the course of evolution.  Envision a house made up of bricks “A” which are composed of bricks “B” which are made from bricks “C”.  In this scenario, the house can be deconstructed in three ways: 1) Reduction to bricks A, 2) reduction of bricks A to bricks B, and 3) reduction of bricks B to bricks C. The result is three levels of bricks in various stages of deconstruction. Why is apoptosis so carefully regulated to insure these “bricks” get completely destroyed? Is it because they may be more than just simple, random chunks of DNA  cut off from the chromatin? I think we can all agree that apoptosis is far too sophisticated a process to be so mundanely trivialized. An alternative explanation is that these “bricks” are genetically dangerous because they are capable of self-replication. In other words, at one point in time they belonged to an independent organism. Without careful deconstruction prior to release, they are genetic “bombs” looking for cells in which to reinsert themselves, causing massive mutations.

Advertisements

About frankabernathy

I am a retired cell biologist and alumnus of Ohio State University. I became interested in chromosomes as far back as the 1960's when I wrote a term paper on the effects of radiomimetic drugs on chromosomes. I was fascinated at how they could break apart and reform new structures so easily. I became further involved in the early 1970's after taking a cytogenetics course at the University of Arkansas. I took that knowledge with me to Ohio State in 1980 where I eventually worked on my research and completed my Ph.D. dissertation, "Studies on Eukaryotic DNA Superstructure". My studies and later research suggested that the DNA within the eukaryotic chromosome is not the simple, linear molecular thread so widely suggested in all the classic textbooks published today. Instead, it may be the culmination of a geologically rapid set of endosymbiotic events where microorganisms plug into each other to create something greater than themselves. Feel free to contact me at fabernathy@sbcglobal.net.
This entry was posted in cellular differentiation, endosymbionts, evolution and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Does apoptosis recapitulate phylogeny in reverse?

  1. I’m impressed, I must say. Rarely do I come across a blog that’s equally educative and amusing, and let me tell you, you have hit the nail on the head. The problem is something that not enough people are speaking intelligently about. I’m very happy I stumbled across this in my hunt for something relating to this.

  2. Izola says:

    excellent points altogether, you simply received a new reader. What would you recommend in regards to your post that you made some days in the past? Any positive?|

    • If you want to find related topics, scroll down on the general posting page and on the right side you will find categories. Select the one that best fits what you are looking for and related posts will come up for you.

  3. Jacquie says:

    I’m really inspired together with your writing abilities as neatly as with the structure for your weblog.

    Is this a paid topic or did you customize it yourself? Anyway stay
    up the nice high quality writing, it’s uncommon to
    see a nice blog like this one today..

  4. Fantastic goods from you, man. I have understand your stuff previous to and you’re
    just extremely magnificent. I actually like what you have acquired here,
    really like what you’re saying and the way in which you say it.
    You make it enjoyable and you still care for to keep it smart.

    I can not wait to read much more from you. This is really a terrific website.

  5. It’s in point of fact a great and useful piece of info.

    I’m glad that you just shared this useful info with us.
    Please keep us informed like this. Thank you for sharing.

  6. Lea says:

    There’s certainly a lot to find out about this subject.
    I love all of the points you made.

  7. Howdy! I could have sworn I’ve been to this blog before but after browsing through many
    of the articles I realized it’s new to me. Anyhow, I’m definitely
    delighted I stumbled upon it and I’ll be book-marking it and checking back often!

  8. Bettina says:

    I’m very happy to discover this website. I need to to thank you for
    ones time just for this fantastic read!!

    I definitely loved every part of it and i also have you book marked to look at new information on your
    website.

  9. Will says:

    Way cool! Some extremely valid points! I appreciate
    you writing this write-up and also the rest of the website is also very good.

  10. This is a topic that is close to my heart… Cheers!
    Exactly where are your contact details though?

  11. Way cool! Some very valid points! I appreciate you penning this article and the rest of the site
    is also very good.

  12. Fastidious answer back in return of this matter with real arguments and explaining all regarding that.

  13. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I truly appreciate your efforts and I am waiting for your further post thank
    you once again.

  14. Madie says:

    Hello. impressive job. I did not expect this.
    This is a great story. Thanks!

  15. Corrine says:

    Pretty section of content. I just stumbled upon your blog
    and in accession capital to assert that I get actually
    enjoyed account your blog posts. Any way I’ll be subscribing
    to your augment and even I achievement you access
    consistently fast. http://pansyjiminez8.webgarden.com/blog/best-driving-games-tips-you-will

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s