Category Archives: cell cycle

Runaway Endosymbionts: What are They?

Runaway Endosymbionts: What are They? Well, I think this needs a bit of elaboration, don’t you? First of all, what exactly is a symbiont, much less and endosymbiont? Fair question. A symbiont is one of two or more organisms engaged … Continue reading

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Apoptosis and Avoidance of Cancer

Well, here we go again, more scientific gibberish. What in the “hey” is apoptosis? Don’t shoot the messenger here, folks, I had nothing to do with the genesis of this word, but I’ll try to explain it so you can see … Continue reading

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Hiding in Plain Site (III)

In the last two posts I shared photomicrographs of mouse L-1210 cells in various stages of decomposition. The unusual structures generated from nuclei appear to be related to the stage in the cell cycle in which the original cell was … Continue reading

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Hiding in Plain Site (II)

I assume that the “woosh, over the head” factor was a bit too much in the last post. That’s ok, got to start somewhere, right? Let’s try that one more time. In fact, if I knew how to do it, … Continue reading

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Hiding in Plain Sight

Like a lot of people, I enjoy tickling living things to get a response out of them. It doesn’t hurt them but you sure know they’re very much alive! Grandkids are one example. In some cases, however, “tickling” is irreversible. … Continue reading

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